Where to File for Unemployment, by State

Posted: September 27th, 2010 | Author: admin | Filed under: Uncategorized | 177 Comments »

The following links will take you to the unemployment page for each state; this is where you should go for state-specific information, as well as (usually) to file for unemployment.

Alabama
Alaska
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
District of Columbia
Florida
Georgia
Hawaii
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Puerto Rico
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virgin Islands
Virginia
Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming


How to File for Unemployment

Posted: September 26th, 2010 | Author: admin | Filed under: Uncategorized | 197 Comments »

These days, filing for unemployment can often be done over the internet, making it more convenient and less embarrassing. Indeed, provided you have net access, the entire process can be completed without ever speaking to another person.

The exact process, of course, depends on the date. Generally you’ll want to visit the website for the state you reside in; it will have instructions for filing your claim. After the claim is accepted, the site will also let you file a request for benefits, which is required every two weeks to continue receiving unemployment.

Before you get started, you’ll want to have the following information handy:

  • Full mailing address
  • Social Security number
  • W2 information for all of your employers in the past two years
  • Dates of employment and pay for all of your employers in the past two years

As part of your application, you’ll be asked whether you want taxes withheld from your benefits; if you choose no, then you will be responsible for paying taxes on the money when you file your next tax return. Many people choose to have taxes deducted and live on what remains.

You will be asked why you are no longer working; you are eligible for unemployment only if you lose your job through no fault of your own. In other words, if you were fired for cause or quit, you are not eligible to collect unemployment benefits.

Finally, once you are approved, every two weeks you must file a new claim for benefits. For each week that you make a claim, you must have looked for work; exact requirements vary by state. Colorado, for example, requires that you make at least five job contacts each week. If you do not look for work, you are not eligible to claim benefits that week. Additionally, you must accept any reasonable job offer you receive.


Unemployment Extension

Posted: September 2nd, 2010 | Author: admin | Filed under: Uncategorized | Comments Off

With jobs still hard to come by in the aftermath of the recession, many people find that the normal 26 weeks of unemployment benefits are not sufficient to last them until they can find a new job. Fortunately, the stimulus bill provided for extended unemployment benefits, which have been renewed several times by Congress (although republicans filibustered the last renewal for some time).

  • Extended unemployment benefits were authorized by the┬áTemporary Extended Unemployment Compensation program in 2002-03, which remained in effect through June of 2010. The Emergency Unemployment Compensation 2009 Program provided for unemployment extensions, as follows:
  • Tier 1: Up to 20 weeks of benefits, in every state
  • Tier 2: Up to 14 additional weeks of benefits, in every state
  • Tier 3: Up to 13 additional weeks of benefits in states that meet one of two requirements: either a 13-week insured unemployment rate of at least 4%, or a 3-month seasonally adjusted total unemployment rate of at least 6%.
  • Tier 4: Up to 6 additional weeks of benefits in states with either a 13-week insured unemployment rate of at least 6%, or a 3-month seasonally adjusted total unemployment rate of at least 8.5%.

Added up, this is 53 weeks of unemployment extension, added to the base 26 weeks to prove 79 weeks of total unemployment benefits; this was temporarily reduced back to 26 weeks until the republican filibuster of the Unemployment Extension 2010 act was overcome, extending eligibility and granting an additional 20 weeks to bring the total to 99; this extension applies through November. A proposed Tier 5 would add yet more weeks to the states that are hardest-hit, but there are no immediate plans to bring it to a vote in the senate.